Colour Analysis

Which Colour Season Are You?

Your colour season determines which kind of colours harmonise with you. This knowledge is therefore of great benefit when creating your personal colour palette. But finding out which colour season you are can be tricky.
This comprehensive guide is designed to help you determine which of the twelve colour seasons you fall into.

Contents

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Before we dive into the analysis, it's a good idea to understand exactly how seasonal colour analysis works. If you are interested in the theory behind colour analysis, please refer to this article.

Each seasonal colour palette mimics the colour aspects of an individual falling into that colour season. What does that mean? You have a natural colour palette, which is manifested in your skin, eyes and hair. The aim of colour analysis is to identify this natural colour palette and to match it to one of the twelve colour seasons.

We do this by evaluating your natural colouring along three colour dimensions:

I. Hue

Colour Analysis - Hue Scale

The hue (or temperature) scale tells us how warm or cool a colour is. The more yellow is added to a colour, the warmer it becomes. The more blue is added to it, the cooler it becomes.

In other words, we need to ask: do you suit warm, neutral or cool colours? The answer will depend on whether your features have warm or cool undertones.

II. Value & Contrast

Colour Analysis - Value Scale
Colour Analysis - Contrast Scale

The value scale tells us how light or dark a colour is. The more black is added to a colour, the darker it becomes. The more white is added to it, the lighter it becomes.

Here we need to ask: do you suit light, medium or dark colours? The answer will depend on how high the contrast between your features is as well as how light or dark your individual features are.

* Your contrast level is not one of the three colour aspects, but it is closely related to value and is a helpful additional metric.

III. Chroma

Colour Analysis - Chroma Scale

The chroma scale depicts how bright/saturated/clear or muted/soft a colour is. Clear colours are pure colours. The more grey is added to a pure colour, the more muted it becomes.

The question here is: do you suit highly saturated colours or greyed-out ones? The answer will depend on how high the natural grey content of your colouring is.

The six colour aspects

We need to find the setting of your natural colouring on each colour dimension - these are your three colour aspects.

One of the three aspects will turn out to be your primary colour aspect - the most important factor of your colouring. That means your colouring will sit at one of the extreme ends of that colour dimension.

Based on three colour dimensions, your primary aspect will be one of the following six:

  • warm or cool (hue)
  • light or dark (value)
  • muted or bright (chroma)

On this colour dimension, you will need the most extreme version of a colour. Even the medium/neutral level won’t look good on you. For example, if your primary aspect is warm, neutral and even neutral-warm colours won’t do anything for you. Only the warmest colours will flatter your appearance.



Your secondary colour aspect significantly influences your colouring. On this dimension, your colouring will sit between one of the extreme ends and the midpoint of the spectrum.

Your secondary aspect can only be one of the following:

  • neutral-warm or neutral-cool (hue)
  • medium-muted or medium-bright (chroma)

On this dimension, you will clearly lean more towards one of the extreme ends of the spectrum, but the most extreme version of a colour will be too much for you. For instance, if your secondary aspect is medium-bright, the most saturated and vibrant colours will swallow you up. Your best colours will be saturated (rather than muted), but they won’t be extremely bright and vibrant.

The third aspect doesn’t have much impact on your colouring. On this dimension, your colouring will be close to the neutral/medium midpoint of the spectrum.

Your third aspect will be either value or chroma, but it cannot be hue.

To sum up, what we are going to do is twofold:

(1) Identify the colour settings of your natural colouring

(2) Match these settings to a colour season with similar settings

This colour season will contain those kinds of colours which are most similar to your own colouring and will therefore harmonise with you.

Note

Bear in mind that although we will analyse each colour dimension separately, in reality, they are interconnected.

Warm colours are inherently light, whereas cool colours are naturally dark. So if your natural colouring is warmer and lighter, it will also be brighter. But when you darken a warm colour, it becomes more muted. So if you are warmer and darker, you are also automatically more muted.

Similarly, if your natural colouring is cooler and darker, it will also be brighter. Whereas if you lighten a cool colour, it becomes more muted. So if you are cooler and lighter, you will automatically be more muted.

Keep this in mind when you are going through the analysis to avoid confusion.

SPRING
warm + light  →  bright

SUMMER
cool + light  →  muted

AUTUMN
warm + dark  →  muted

WINTER
cool + dark  →  bright


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I. Hue

A hue is a colour family (orange, green, purple etc), and any hue can appear as a warm or a cool colour (for instance, a warm mossy green vs a cool grass green). What we are really concerned with here is the hue’s undertones. The more yellow you add to a colour, the warmer it becomes. The more blue you add to it, the cooler it gets.

That’s why colours with yellow undertones are warm colours, while colours with blue undertones are deemed cool colours. So a mossy green will contain a lot of yellow, whereas a grass green will contain a big portion of blue. More neutral colours have predominantly red undertones.

Colour Analysis - Hue Scale

In other words, this aspect of your colouring determines whether you look better in warm, neutral or cool colours. And that will depend on whether your features have warm (yellow) undertones, cool (blue) undertones, or neutral (red) undertones.

The full undertone spectrum looks like this:

Colour Analysis - Full Hue Scale

All of your facial features have the same undertones. But your skin may be the most difficult feature to analyse because the undertone is not freely visible. So we will discuss skin tones first.

Determine your skin undertone

Human skin comes in all kinds of shades ranging from fair to deep and all shades in-between. But whether your skin is light or dark is not relevant here. What is essential is whether it is warm or cool.

And that is because clothing colours in the wrong hue will visually highlight imperfections, emphasise shadows on your face and make your skin tone appear uneven.

Determining your skin undertone is thus a crucial exercise that will positively impact your wardrobe and your appearance. But how do you know whether you have warm or cool undertones?

The difference between undertone and overtone

You might have been struggling to determine your skin tone in the past. And the reason for that may be that you were paying too much attention to your overtone.

What exactly is an overtone? It’s the colouring of your outward appearance: the colour of your skin, hair and eyes are all the result of the unique combination of melanin (black, blue, brown) and carotene (yellow, orange, red) levels.

You may have thought that you were warm because of the yellowness in your skin only to find out that warm colours make you look even more yellow. But with skin, what you see is not always what you get. And that is due to skin undertones.

Undertone refers to the underlying colour of your skin tone. It can sit anywhere on the spectrum of cool (blue) through neutral (red) to warm (yellow).

You can imagine your skin tone like this: undertone + overtone = skin tone. The mixing of the undertone with the overtone can produce confusion. We need to therefore understand how undertones appear when mixed with different overtones. Let’s break this down.

The undertone of your skin sits somewhere on the hue scale. Warm undertones are yellow, cool ones are blue and neutral ones are red. Although green is also a neutral colour, it is not one of the three primary colours. And no one has a green undertone - not to be confused with olive skin.

Skin Undertones

Skin overtone is the overlaying colour of your skin or what it looks like outwardly. Overtones range from fair to deep and are mostly determined by your ethnicity. And if you are familiar with makeup foundations, you will know that manufacturers also like to split their product ranges into different overtones. Below are six overtones ranging from light to dark on the value scale.

Skin Overtones

Now if we combine skin undertones and overtones, we get actual skin tones. In other words, this is how the skin actually looks:

Skin Undertones + Skin Overtones

As you can see, the warmer skin tones look more yellow, the neutral ones more pink or reddish, and the cool ones appear more blueish.

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To find your undertone, you can simply compare your skin to this chart. If you are not be able to spot your skin tone straight away, don’t worry. There is a well-known test you can use to help you find your undertones.

Metal test

This test is the popular metal test. It’s simple: Do you look better in gold or silver? If gold suits you, you have warm undertones. If silver looks good on you, your undertones are cool. And if both metals look fine on you, you have neutral undertones. This is a great way to determine your skin undertone - as long as you know what to look for.

How does the test work?

If you have very warm or very cool undertones, you will see a strongly negative reaction to either silver or gold.

Colour Analysis - Gold & Silver

If there is no strong reaction against either metal, your skin tone has neutral undertones. If one of the metals looks slightly better than the other one, your skin has either neutral-warm or neutral-cool undertones.

A reaction to gold or silver is caused by a clash of two undertones. Warm skin has clear yellow undertones. If you put something silver near it, the blue undertone of the silver will turn the skin a sickly green (because yellow + blue = green).

Similarly, if you put something gold near cool skin, the yellow gold will clash with the blue undertones of the skin. The result is again a sickly, greenish tinge.

A neutral skin tone will not have such a strong reaction because its undertone is red. In this case, yellow gold will mix with red to produce orange, and blue silver will mix with red to create purple. Both orange and purple form part of the hue scale and occur as natural skin undertones. Green, however, is not a skin undertone, which is why a green tinge causes the skin to look off.

You can see the effects in the following graphic, in which the three pure undertone hues were mixed with gold on the left and silver on the right:

Gold & Silver Effects on Skin

The resulting colours all appear ‘healthy’ except for the third one in the first row and the first one in the third row. In these spots, yellow was mixed with silver and blue mixed with gold. In both cases, the result is a ‘sickly’ greenish colour. That is why it is so important to wear colours with the right undertones.

I. Warm undertones

Warm skin has clear yellow undertones. Depending on the overtone, warm skin tones may look differently. But the yellow undertone is always visible:

Colour Analysis - Skin With Warm Undertones

How to spot warm undertones

Skin with very warm undertones does not tolerate silver and will have a strong reaction against the metal. Silver makes warm skin appear pale, ‘muddy’ and greenish (because yellow undertones + blue silver = green). But gold draws out the naturally present yellow undertones and creates a glowing skin tone.

Skin With Warm Undertones Example

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

II. Cool undertones

Cool skin has clear blue undertones. Depending on the overtone, cool skin tones may look differently. But the blue undertone is always visible:

Colour Analysis - Skin With Cool Undertones

How to spot cool undertones

Skin with cool undertones does not tolerate gold and will have a strong reaction against the metal. Gold makes cool skin appear weirdly yellowish or greenish (because blue undertones + yellow gold = green). But silver draws out the naturally present blue undertones and creates an even skin tone.

Skin With Cool Undertones Example

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II. Neutral undertones

If your skin does not have a strong reaction to gold or silver, your skin undertone is closer to neutral. It may be neutral-warm, neutral-cool or pure neutral.

Colour Analysis - Skin with Neutral Undertones

How to spot neutral undertones

Pure neutral skin has neither yellow nor blue undertones but red ones. Since red acts as a neutralising colour, skin with neutral undertones does not have a reaction against either gold or silver. Both metals create an equally healthy, even skin tone.

Neutral-warm skin has orange undertones (because warm yellow + neutral red = orange). Again, this type of skin does not have a strong reaction against either gold or silver. However, since neutral-warm skin is warmer, gold will always be the more foolproof and more suitable choice. This is because gold emphasises the yellowish undertones of neutral-warm skin.

Neutral-cool skin has purple undertones (because cool blue + neutral red = purple). This type of skin does not have a strong reaction against either gold or silver either. However, since neutral-cool skin is still cooler rather than warmer, silver will always be the more foolproof and more suitable choice. This is because silver emphasises the blueish undertones of neutral-cool skin. Additionally, many individuals on the cooler side of the spectrum naturally struggle to wear gold, even if they have neutral-cool undertones.

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Determine your hair undertone

While your skin tone is the most obvious physical feature to test, your hair may also give you helpful clues about your undertones.

Colour Analysis - Hair Undertones

In general, hair with warm undertones tends to appear as bright golden hues (even on darker hair), whereas ashy hair indicates cool undertones. The two extreme hair colours black and platinum blonde are typically cool.

Red hair can be either warm or cool. Strawberry blonde, copper and other bright orangey reds typically have warm undertones. But darker auburns and more blueish reds have cool undertones.

More neutral-coloured hair has weakened versions of the hair colours shown above.

Determine your eye undertone

Just like skin and hair, eyes also have various undertones and may be able to give you additional clues.

Colour Analysis - Eye Undertones

Just like skin, warm eyes have yellow undertones. When mixed with the overlaying eye colour (blue, green or brown), the resulting eye colours become turquoise blues, mossy greens and ochre browns.

Warm eyes will become highlighted when you hold something gold next to them because the gold will draw out the yellow undertones. As a general guideline, warmer eyes also tend to be brighter and lighter than cool eyes.

Eyes with cool undertones, on the other hand, have blue undertones. Pure black eyes are also cool. Often, cool eyes tend to appear less clear and more greyish. These eyes will pop if you hold something silver next to them because the silver will draw out the blue undertones.

More neutral-coloured eyes are somewhere between these two extremes.

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II. Value & Contrast

Value (or depth) describes how light or dark a colour is. The more black is added to a colour, the darker it becomes. The more white is added to a colour, the lighter it gets.

A colour that has been darkened by adding black is called a shade. And a colour which has been lightened by adding white is referred to as tint. For instance, a dark navy blue is a shade of blue, whereas a light pastel blue is a tint of blue.

In other words, this aspect of your colouring looks at how light or dark your colours should be. And that will depend on how light or dark your overall colouring and that of your individual features is.

The full value spectrum looks like this:

Colour Analysis - Full Value Scale

Contrast level

Hand in hand with value goes the concept of contrast. Generally, contrast is the level of difference in value between two or more colours. For instance, black and white are highly contrasted because their values are as different as can be. Two medium greys, on the other hand, have low contrast because their values are very similar.

Another way to look at contrast is by seeing how far apart two colours are on the colour wheel. Two hues which sit on opposite sides of the colour wheel will have very high contrast. For example, yellow and purple are opposites, and as such, they are highly contrasted. And that is because yellow is light, but purple has a dark value.

The closer together colours are, the lower the level of contrast between them. Neighbouring hues, such as orange and red, have low contrast because they both have medium values.

Colour Analysis - Contrast Levels

Determine your value & contrast

The value of any colour becomes apparent if you desaturate it (convert it into greyscale). For instance, below are the three primary colours fully saturated and completely desaturated:

Colour Analysis - Value Examples

We can see that yellow has a light value because it is the lightest hue on the colour wheel. As the darkest hue on the colour wheel, blue has a dark value. And red, the neutral hue, has a medium value.

To determine the value of your own colouring, you can do a similar thing: convert your photo into greyscale and examine where your overall colouring falls on the value scale. Then understand the composition of values in your photo. How many areas are light, medium and dark? This will give you your contrast level.

I. Light Value

Individuals with a light value have similarly light hair, skin and eyes. This creates a low contrast between the features.

Colour Analysis - Light Value

How to spot a light value

An individual with a light value has no features that are dark or medium in value. All features are equally light. Consequently, there will be no medium or dark areas in a desaturated image of them. And all areas are similarly light, meaning the contrast between the features is low.

Colour Analysis - Light Value Examples

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

II. Dark Value

Individuals with a dark value have prominent dark hair and eyes, which stand in contrast to lighter skin. The contrast between the features is deemed high.

Colour Analysis - Dark Value

How to spot a dark value

Individuals with a dark value have dark hair and eyes paired with lighter skin. This does not mean that the skin has to be very light (though it can), it just needs to be lighter in relation to the dark features. This creates a high contrast between the features.

Colour Analysis - Dark Value Examples

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

II. Medium Value

If you cannot clearly identify with a light or dark value, your appearance is closer to a medium value. Individuals with a medium value have either (1) overall mid-tones in hair, skin and eyes, or (2) light skin and eyes but dark hair, or (3) overall dark features. The contrast between the features is then either medium or high.

Colour Analysis - Medium Value

How to spot a medium value

Individuals with a medium value have neither prominent light nor prominent dark features. All features have a similar medium colouring. This creates an overall medium contrast between them.

There are two caveats to this, though. If you have light skin and eyes paired with dark hair (or non-prominent dark features as described above), you will also fall into this category. But in this case, the resulting contrast between your features is high rather than medium.

Similarly, if all of your features are very dark with very little difference in value between your hair, eyes and skin, you will also fall into this category. In this case, the contrast between your features is also deemed high because the dark features contrast with the whites of the eyes and the teeth.

This is very much a default category. If your features are neither light nor prominently dark, you will be at home here.

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

The Wardrobe Guide

Struggling to determine your value? Check out the full range of examples in the wardrobe guide.

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III. Chroma

Chroma describes how bright/clear or muted/soft a colour is. Clear or bright colours are pure colours. These are fully saturated colours.

The more grey is added to a pure colour, the more muted it becomes. Muted colours are therefore desaturated, greyed out colours, which are much less intense than their pure counterparts. They are also called tones. So a hot pink would be a pure colour because it is fully saturated and vibrant. But a dusky rose would be a tone because it is soft.

Colour Analysis - Chroma Scale

In other words, this aspect of your colouring determines whether you look better in highly saturated, medium-saturated or desaturated colours. And that will depend on the amount of grey pigments present in your natural colouring.

A high content of grey pigments indicates a muted appearance, whereas the absence of grey pigments creates a bright appearance.

Colour Analysis - Full Chroma Scale

Determine your chroma

To determine your chroma, you can refer back to the principle mentioned in the beginning: if you are warm and light, you will also be bright. But if you are warm and dark, you are automatically muted.
Similarly, if you are cool and dark, you will automatically be bright. But if you are cool and light, you will also be muted.

This principle alone should help you decide your chroma level. But to be sure, let’s understand what it means to have high or low chroma.

I. High chroma (bright)

Individuals with high chroma have a bright appearance. Hair, skin and eyes are fully saturated. Features are vibrant and full of colour. This type of colouring lacks grey pigments.

In addition, the high saturation creates a high contrast between the features.

Colour Analysis - High Chroma

How to spot high chroma

Individuals with high chroma cannot wear grey (or other fashion neutrals) on its own without becoming dulled and washed out. But they are able to wear highly saturated colours without disappearing behind them.

Colour Analysis - High Chroma Example

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

I. Low chroma (muted)

Individuals with low chroma have a muted appearance. Hair, skin and eyes have a desaturated, greyish or ashy quality. And there is little to no vibrancy in the features. This type of colouring contains a high amount of grey pigments.

In addition, the contrast between the features tends to be quite low due to the lack of saturation.

Colour Analysis - Low Chroma

How to spot low chroma

Individuals with low chroma can wear grey (and other fashion neutrals) on its own without being washed out. To muted appearances, such understated colours add a graceful elegance. But individuals with low chroma are unable to wear highly saturated colours without being swallowed up by them.

Colour Analysis - Low Chroma Example

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

I. Medium chroma

If you cannot clearly identify with high or low chroma, your colouring has medium chroma. It may be brighter or more muted, but it’s not at one of the two extreme ends. In this case, your best colours will be either slightly more saturated or slightly more muted based on your colour season.

The Wardrobe Guide

Struggling to determine your chroma? Check out the full range of examples in the wardrobe guide.

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Your Colour Season

You should now have discovered your settings on the three colour dimensions. Remember, one of the three dimensions will house your primary colour aspect - the most important aspect of your natural colouring. This aspect will be paired with your secondary colour aspect to form your colour season. Let's go through each possible combination one by one.

Warm

Your primary colour aspect is warm if the first thing that strikes you about your appearance is the obvious warmth radiating from your features and the complete lack of coolness. Your skin has an obvious yellow, golden or caramel undertone.

Contrast: The overall contrast level of your features is medium. No feature is extremely light or extremely dark compared to the rest.

Eyes: Light to medium brown, olive green, dark hazel, light hazel or warm blue (often with a yellowish rim around the pupil).

Hair: Usually neither very dark nor very light, has a medium intensity - light to medium golden blond through to medium brown, or strawberry blond or rich and warm red (copper).

Main aspect: The obvious warmth coming from your appearance. It could be either a radiant, warm glow or a more subdued warmth (depending on your secondary aspect), but there is an overall lack of coolness.

Deciding factor: Silver makes you look pale and pasty, but gold gives you a healthy glow.

Primary Colour Aspect - Warm

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Secondary aspect: bright or muted

A warm primary aspect can be paired with bright (True Spring) or muted (True Autumn) as secondary aspect. Both True Spring and True Autumn look off in silver and cool colours. But True Spring needs saturated, fresh colours with higher chroma to truly shine, whereas True Autumn looks amazing in rich, earthy colours which are more muted. Notice how Jessica's features are more contrasted, whereas Chrissy's blend more.

If you are unsure which season you are, try Jessica's orangey red lipstick for True Spring and Chrissy's brown lipstick for True Autumn. Browns are too earthy for True Springs.

Colour Analysis - True Spring & True Autumn

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Cool

Your primary colour aspect is cool if the first thing that strikes you about your colouring is the total absence of warmth and the distinctive coolness coming from your features. Your skin has obvious blue or greyish undertones (with clear blue veins).

Contrast: The overall contrast level of your features is medium to high. You may have very dark hair in contrast to a lighter skin tone.

Hair: Ash blond through to black, all brown shades with no highlights, silver, grey/silver mix.

Eyes: Cool blue, grey blue, cool hazel, dark brown, charcoal grey, black.

Main aspect: The obvious coolness coming from your appearance combined with a higher contrast between hair and skin. This coolness can either be a frosted, icy vibe or a more gentle, subdued coolness (depending on your secondary characteristic).

Deciding factor: Gold makes you look yellowish and sickly, but silver makes you look healthy.

Primary Colour Aspect - Cool

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Secondary aspect: muted or bright

A cool primary aspect can be paired with muted (True Summer) or bright (True Winter) as secondary aspect. These two colour seasons are both cool and look off in gold and other warm colours. But True Winter is more contrasted and intense than True Summer and requires colours with higher chroma. The latter is overwhelmed by the saturated colours of Winter and needs a gentler coolness with lower chroma.

If you are undecided between the two seasons, try Sonam's gentler pink lipstick for True Summer and Lucy's brighter pink for True Winter.

Colour Analysis - True Summer & True Winter

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Light

Your primary colour aspect is light if the first thing that strikes you about your appearance is the absence of depth in your features.

Contrast: The contrast between your skin, hair, and eye colours is low - meaning that all features are similarly light.

Eyes: Light to medium blue or green and light hazel or light brown.

Hair: Very light - Light to medium ash or golden blonde, or soft/light auburn, or light to medium brown.

Main aspect: The lightness of the features' colouring (not to be confused with muted colouring: it's not greyed out but much more lively) and the lack of depth in the features.

Deciding factor: Very dark colours age you, but light, colourful tints make your appearance pop. Note that light colours in this analysis are not to be confused with muted colours, which are greyish. Those will make you look washed out.

Primary Colour Aspect - Light

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Secondary aspect: warm or cool

The primary aspect light can be paired with warm (Light Spring) and cool (Light Summer). The two light seasons can be quite tricky to tell apart at first glance. Both are instantly aged if they put on anything that's dark. But they are easy to spot once they are dressed in either Spring or Summer colours.

If you can't decide between the two, try out Scarlett's orangey lipstick for Light Spring and Margot's cooler pink for Light Summer.

Colour Analysis - Light Spring vs Light Summer

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Dark

Your primary colour aspect is dark if the first thing that strikes you about your appearance is the depth of your features. This aspect can either mean that all of your features are dark or your hair and eyes are dark compared to your light skin.

Contrast: The contrast between your skin, hair, and eye colours is high. Your dark hair and eyes stand in contrast to a lighter skin tone, or the whites of the eyes and teeth stand in contrast to dark skin, hair and eyes.

Eyes: Black, black-brown, red-brown, brown. If you have an eye colour other than the ones stated, you are not dark.

Hair: Very dark - Black, black-brown, chestnut brown, dark auburn.

Main aspect: Overall dark features or prominent dark features in combination with a high contrast level.

Deciding factor: Very dark colours make your eyes and hair pop, and you can wear them comfortably without being overwhelmed. Light, colourful colours, on the other hand, pale and wash you out.

Primary Colour Aspect - Dark

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Secondary aspect: warm or cool

The primary aspect dark can be paired with warm (Dark Autumn) or cool (Dark Winter). Dark Autumns and Dark Winters both look elegant in dark, mysterious colours. They are generally quite easy to tell apart. Dark Autumns tend to have that golden, bronzy glow to them, whereas Dark Winters tend to look frostier.

If you are unsure though, try Olivia's dark red for Dark Autumn and Kelly's dark, purply lipstick for Dark Winter. Purple does not sit well with Dark Autumns.

Colour Analysis - Dark Autumn & Dark Winter

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Bright

Your primary colour aspect is bright if the first thing that strikes you about your appearance is the clearness and saturation of your features. There is no greyness in your colouring and your features don't blend but contrast. They clearly stand out against each other.

Contrast: The overall contrast level of your features is high to very high. Your eyes may stand out against your skin and hair.

Eyes: May stand out against skin and hair - clear blue, turquoise blue or green, bright green, emerald, or sparkly amber/topaz, brown, dark brown, black. The whites are clearly defined.

Hair: Black, black-brown, medium to dark brown, bright golden blonde or red hair, very golden white-blond.

Main aspect: Your features are highly contrasted and saturated. They don't blend and there is no greyness about them.

Deciding factor: You can comfortably wear highly saturated colours without them stealing the show, but greyish, unsaturated colours make you look very bland.

Primary Colour Aspect - Bright

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Secondary aspect: warm or cool

The primary aspect bright can be paired with warm (Bright Spring) or cool (Bright Winter). The difference between Bright Spring and Bright Winter is the more frosted appearance of the latter. Both need highly saturated colours, but Bright Winter needs the slightly darker, even more intense colours of Winter, which are a bit too much for Bright Spring. Bright Springs look amazing in warmer, fresher and slightly lighter colours.

If you are unsure whether you are a Bright Spring or a Bright Winter, try Lupita's cooler pink lipstick for Bright Winter and Milla's warmer coral pink lipstick for Bright Spring.

Colour Analysis - Bright Spring & Bright Winter

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Muted

Your primary colour aspect is muted if the first thing that strikes you about your appearance is how 'greyed out' it is. You have a high content of grey pigments in your colouring. Instead of contrasting, your features are all very similar and blend into each other. You can at first appear to be light, but you have a richer look.

Contrast: The overall contrast level of your features is low to medium. Skin, hair, and eyes have a similarly low intensity. Features blend rather than contrast.

Eyes: Blend in with skin and hair - hazel, brown, grey-green, grey-blue.

Hair: Neither very light nor very dark - usually ashy. Golden or ash blond through to medium brown, strawberry blond through to soft auburn, medium to dark ash brown, light grey.

Main aspect: The lack of contrast in your features resulting in a blended appearance and the obvious greyness of your colouring.

Deciding factor: Saturated colours instantly draw attention away from you and onto themselves, but muted colours give you a sophisticated elegance. If muted colours make you look bland and washed out, this is not your primary colour aspect.

Primary Colour Aspect - Muted

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Secondary aspect: cool or warm

The primary aspect muted can be paired with cool (Soft Summer) or warm (Soft Autumn). Just like the two light seasons, the two muted seasons can be hard to tell apart because both are very unsaturated, which makes colours appear similar. The difference between them is the higher content of grey pigments in Soft Summer vs the higher content of walnut and olive pigments in Soft Autumn.

How to tell the difference? Try Sarah Jessica's nude pink for Soft Summer and Gigi's nude brown for Soft Autumn. Soft Autumns can pull off earthier Autumn shades which would look off on Soft Summers.

Colour Analysis - Soft Summer & Soft Autumn

More examples in The Wardrobe Guide

Once you have found your colour season, you can learn more about it in the comprehensive colour guides.

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The Wardrobe Guide

How do you build a flattering and functional wardrobe?

Buying a bunch of clothes because they look nice in the shop is not a good strategy for building a wardrobe. It implies that the look of your clothes is more important than your look. But clothes should have no other purpose than to bring out your natural beauty and to highlight it.

The wardrobe guide will help you discover those garments that truly suit you.

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The Wardrobe Guide - Product Image